Author Topic: The Seven Churches  (Read 528 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Robert Sanders

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 49
The Seven Churches
« on: July 30, 2016, 06:31:54 PM »
What happen
to the seven churches in the book of Revelation?

Where did they go?

Did they fall by the wayside?

Why are they not still here today on earth?

Robert Sanders

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 49
Re: The Seven Churches
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2016, 06:33:07 PM »
I know what happened to them

I want to see if any of you know what happened to them?

Defacto

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 75
  • WWII Vet
Re: The Seven Churches
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2016, 08:26:28 PM »
I know what happened to them

I want to see if any of you know what happened to them?



The seven letters to the seven churches in chapters two and three of the book of Revelation have been applied to the body of Christ with at least two interpretations. The successive historical view states that each of the churches represent seven different eras throughout the present church age. The first four are referred to describe the history of the church from its first decline to its latter condition in Popery; the last three are the history of Protestantism. This view originated with J. N. Darby and the Plymouth Brethren. According to this view we would now be in the Laodicean church era. The problem with this view, however, is that it makes the characteristics too general for each of the seven churches to fit with that particular period of historical time. This is no less than what astrology does, making any individual's general characteristics fitting any of the zodiac. Neither is there any suggestion in the book of Revelation where this is even implied and thereby is erroneous. The other views that suggest these seven churches are the body of Christ are strained in their interpretation as well.

All the symbolism describing the seven churches is strongly suggestive of Messianic Jewish churches in their characteristics. It is also curious that these seven churches were all located within a small circle in Asia Minor in the first century (Rev.1:4a); today this area is known as Turkey. [Art used by permission by Pat Marvenko Smith, copyright 1992. Click here to visit her "Revelation Illustrated" site.] An example of this is in the letter of James where in the salutation James says, "to the twelve tribes who are dispersed abroad..." (James 1:1 NASB). Now here James is clearly addressing Messianic Jewish churches. The theology of the letter of James is "works" oriented with the Jewish traditions in mind and contrary to the Pauline theology of only grace. The churches Paul established during his three missionary journeys were scattered throughout the civilized world. Many modern churches have wrestled and stumbled over this early "works" oriented letter of James, attempting to force this theology to to the body of Christ during our church age. This "works" theology is also clearly seen as a theme in the seven letters to the seven churches. In fact, in the entire book of Revelation there is only one reference to the church, as the body of Christ (Rev. 7:9-17) and even here it is "seen" as from a Jewish point of view. I.e., the body of Christ seen in heaven, immediately after the rapture, is described with "Gentile" characteristics (e.g., v. 9; c.f., v. 4). John, not Paul, was chosen to be given the Revelation of Jesus. This is significant because Paul was "set apart" (Acts 13:2, Rom. 1:1 NASB) to exclusively be the apostle to the Gentiles while John was one of the twelve apostles to the early Messianic Jewish church.

Since the beginnings of the reformation "displacement theology" has existed in some form thus confusing the body of Christ as to its place in God's program during our dispensation of grace in this church age. Displacement theology is defined as when the church, as the body of Christ, takes the promises and blessings, meant for Israel, upon itself. An interesting note is that when the church does this it conveniently leaves all the curses with Israel! The promises of God to Israel and the numerous prophecies about Israel make it clear that God is not through with Israel, the "apple of His eye." The book of Revelation, and specifically the seven letters to the seven churches, is particularly to the Messianic Jewish church historically in the first century when in Asia Minor, and generally in the last days as the day of the Lord approaches. The body of Christ has the responsibility to understand and correctly interpret the book of Revelation in order to know its place in God's administration and its relationship to Israel and God's final plan for her, and His consummated redemption for mankind.


Defacto



Hal

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 460
Re: The Seven Churches
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2016, 10:12:06 PM »



Seven Church Periods
https://www.blueletterbible.org/study/larkin/dt/22.cfm

Defacto

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 75
  • WWII Vet
Re: The Seven Churches
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2016, 07:26:10 AM »
From another source:

he following is a brief interpretation about the seven churches in Rev.2 and 3 by Dr. Harold L. Wilmington, Professor at Liberty University .

"At the time Revelation was written [Either A.D. 65 or 95] there may have existed well over 100 separate and independent local churches in the world. Paul, had of course, personally planted dozens of churches by himself. Other apostles would doubtless have done the same thing. But out of the many, Christ chose seven representative churches and addressed himself to these. It has been suggested that the listing of these seven appears in the sacred record to accomplish at least the following purposes:

A. The contemporary purpose: That Christ had a direct message to seven literal churches existing at that time.

B. The composite purpose: That these messages are meant to be applied to all churches existing in all times.

C. The chronological purpose: That the characteristics of these churches serve as a prophetical preview of the seven great periods in Christiandom from Pentecost to the rapture. A suggested outline of this predictive panorama may be seen as follows:

1. Ephesus [A.D. 30- - name means "desirable." The Apostolic Church.

2. Smyrna [300-313] - name means "Myrrh." The Martyr Church.

3. Pergamos [314-590 - name means "marriage." The Compromising Church.

4. Thyatira [590-1517] - name means "continual sacrifice." The Roman Catholic Church.

5. Sardis [1517-1700 - name means "remnant." The Reformation Church.

6. Philadelphia [1700-1900 - name means "brotherly love." The Revival Church.

7. Laodicea [1900-rapture] - name means "people's rights." The Worldly Church.

In Revelation 2 and 3, the Savior speaks his mind to what is seven divisions of one Church. It is therefore in these chapters [and not in Mt.28 or Acts 1] that the final words of Christ to the Church are recorded. Which covers the entire Church age."

Blessings,

Defacto

Defacto

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 75
  • WWII Vet
Re: The Seven Churches
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2016, 07:45:19 AM »
Another view of the seven churches in Revelation 2 and 3:

The seven churches were local Asia Minor Churches-and the messages are intended for exhortation, warning, and edification of believers and churches throughout the entire Church Age.

Christís messages to the seven local Churches in the western Asia Minor are intended for the exhortation, warning, and edification of the believers through-out this entire church age. In addition, though there was seven churches in which letters were directed, they are but one church, the One Body of Christ, in the various conditions that will exist in them throughout the entire church age.

The relevance for churches today is:

1. A revelation of what Jesus Christ Himself loves and values in His churches as well as what He doesnít like and condemns.

2. A clear statement from Christ regarding consequences of disobedience and spiritual neglect and the rewards for spiritual vigilance and faithfulness to Christ.

3. An example of the methods that satan uses to attack the church or the individual Christians.

4. Christ praises the church for not bearing with evil persons, for testing the life, doctrine, and claims of Christian leaders; for preserving in faith, love, witness, service, and suffering of Christófor overcoming sin, (hating sin)-overcoming satan, and the ungodly world. Also, for refusing to conform to immorality in the world and worldliness in the Church.

5. He rewards the Churche by saving them from the time of trial that will come upon the whole world. By giving them His love, presence, and close fellowship, and blessing them with eternal life with God.

Christ condemns the Church for not maintaining a close relationship with the Father and Himself.:

1. departing from Biblical truth
2. tolerating immoral church leaders
3. for becoming spiritually dead
4. being lukewarm

How to avoid this:

1. The Church must avoid spiritual decline by being willing to hear what the Spirit says to the Church
2. The Word of Jesus Christ- ALWAYS is the guide.
3. Churches must continually examine their spiritual condition.
4. Sincere repentance and a diligent return to their original love.


Defacto