Author Topic: Metaphorical Uses of Slavery by James A. Brooks  (Read 243 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

JB Horn

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 456
Metaphorical Uses of Slavery by James A. Brooks
« on: February 22, 2017, 06:08:31 PM »
Metaphorical Uses of Slavery


In most ancient societies, few things were more despicable than to be a slave. In Israel , however, the idea emerged that it was a great privilege to be a servant or slave of God (the various Hebrew and Greek words could be translated either). Many of the heroes of the Old Testament are so called (Ex. 32:13 ; Deut. 34:5 ; 2 Sam. 7:5 ; 2 Kings 21:10 ). Very significant are the Servant Songs of Isaiah 42:1-4 ; Isaiah 49:1-6; Isaiah 50:4-9 ; and Isaiah 52:13-53:12, which originally referred to Israel but were reinterpreted by the early church to refer to Jesus. See Servant of the Lord.
Jesus adopted a servantís role (John 13:4-5 ; Mark 10:45 ; compare Phil. 2:7 ) and indicated that His disciples should also (Matt. 6:24; Matt 10:24; Matt 24:45-46 ; Luke 17:10 ; John 13:12-16 ). Paul referred to himself as a slave or servant of Jesus Christ (Rom. 1:1 ; Gal. 1:10 ; Phil. 1:1 ), as did ( James 1:1 ), Peter (2 Pet. 1:1 ), and( Jude 1 ).
There are three other metaphorical uses of slavery in the New Testament. A life of sin is spoken of as slavery (John 8:34 ; Rom. 6:6 , 16-20 ; Heb. 2:15 ). Legalism is a kind of slavery (Gal. 4:24-25; Gal 5:1 ). Paradoxically, however, there is also a blessed slavery to righteousness (Rom. 6:16-22 ).


James A. Brooks

Moss

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 524
Re: Metaphorical Uses of Slavery by James A. Brooks
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2017, 11:42:29 AM »
The whole us of the word SLAVE in the Bible can be translated in many ways.  Many times it is used to mean bond servant, a person who works  to pay off the debt, or even just an employee of the master.

I have a debt that I can never pay,  fortunately God's grace does not require a payment of the debt.

Fat

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1214
Re: Metaphorical Uses of Slavery by James A. Brooks
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2017, 11:31:20 PM »
The whole us of the word SLAVE in the Bible can be translated in many ways.  Many times it is used to mean bond servant, a person who works  to pay off the debt, or even just an employee of the master.

I have a debt that I can never pay,  fortunately God's grace does not require a payment of the debt.

Ran across this Moss:

Quote from: Daily Readings By Charles H. Spurgeon

ďTherefore, brethren, we are debtors.Ē
- Romans 8:12

As Godís creatures, we are all debtors to him: to obey him with all our body, and soul, and strength. Having broken his commandments, as we all have, we are debtors to his justice, and we owe to him a vast amount which we are not able to pay. But of the Christian it can be said that he does not owe Godís justice anything, for Christ has paid the debt his people owed; for this reason the believer owes the more to love. I am a debtor to Godís grace and forgiving mercy; but I am no debtor to his justice, for he will never accuse me of a debt already paid. Christ said, ďIt is finished!Ē and by that he meant, that whatever his people owed was wiped away for ever from the book of remembrance. Christ, to the uttermost, has satisfied divine justice; the account is settled; the handwriting is nailed to the cross; the receipt is given, and we are debtors to Godís justice no longer. But then, because we are not debtors to our Lord in that sense, we become ten times more debtors to God than we should have been otherwise. Christian, pause and ponder for a moment. What a debtor thou art to divine sovereignty! How much thou owest to his disinterested love, for he gave his own Son that he might die for thee. Consider how much you owe to his forgiving grace, that after ten thousand affronts he loves you as infinitely as ever. Consider what you owe to his power; how he has raised you from your death in sin; how he has preserved your spiritual life; how he has kept you from falling; and how, though a thousand enemies have beset your path, you have been able to hold on your way. Consider what you owe to his immutability. Though you have changed a thousand times, he has not changed once. Thou art as deep in debt as thou canst be to every attribute of God. To God thou owest thyself, and all thou hast-yield thyself as a living sacrifice, it is but thy reasonable service.

Fat