Author Topic: Unity or Unanimity at Reformed Council?(what communion hath light with darknes?)  (Read 1668 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

admin

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 169
Unity or Unanimity at Reformed Council?

by Jordan Ballor

Global Christianity comes to Grand Rapids, Mich., this weekend in the form of the Uniting General Council of the World Communion of Reformed Churches (WCRC). Thousands of delegates, exhibitors, and volunteers will gather on the campus of Calvin College to mark the union of two Reformed ecumenical groups, the World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) and the Reformed Ecumenical Council (REC). This new global ecumenical body will include 227 denominations in 108 nations worldwide, with over 80 million Christians of broadly Reformed, Congregational, and Presbyterian membership.

But the proceedings over the next two weeks will go far beyond mere celebration and praise at the joining of these various groups. The future course of the newly formed WCRC will be set at this first council, and all signs point to an institution defined by a narrow set of advocacy items rather than a Gospel-oriented vision. As WARC president Clifton Kirkpatrick has said, "A true test of the value of our impending union will be how it enhances and strengthens our commitment to economic and ecological justice."

The basis for the WCRC's exploration of justice is a document called the Accra Confession, named for the last general council of WARC, held in Accra, Ghana in 2004, which produced the text in response to a perceived crisis of the Christian faith. In the words of the Accra Confession, the crisis calls for "a decision of faith commitment," specifically focused on condemning "the development of neoliberal economic globalization." At the core of this "faith commitment" is a perspective that views the developing world as victimized at the hands of a vast conspiratorial network of developed nations, multinational corporations, and global financial institutions. The primary villain in this "neoliberal empire" is the United States, cast as the leader of "the coming together of economic, cultural, political and military power that constitutes a system of domination led by powerful nations to protect and defend their own interests."


http://www.acton.org/commentary/593_unity_or_unanimity_at_reformed_council.php



Quote from: 2 Corinthians 6:14 KJ
Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness?